Homeopathy: Finding the Cure in the Cause

pellets-flowers-vile-imageLike cures like. That’s the concept behind homeopathy, a centuries-old system that stimulates the body’s innate healing ability. In 1796, Samuel Hahnemann, M.D. observed that Cinchona Bark, a medicinal plant used by native people in South America to treat malaria, could also caused the symptoms of malaria in healthy people. After testing the theory on himself, he continued his research, establishing the “dynamic” effect of a homeopathic substance: The small amount of the disease-causing agent in the remedy stimulates the healing process and with fewer side effects.

 

Let’s look at the example with regular onion. You remember how you feel when you peel and chop fresh onion in the kitchen? The eyes are burning and tearing, your nose starts running and all you want to do is to get out from that kitchen to the fresh air. Now, imagine you have  seasonal allergy, hay fever, and your symptoms include burning, itchy eyes, runny nose and all those symptoms get better on the fresh air. In this case, the small quantity of onion (Allium Cepa), prepared according to homeopathic traditions will help to alleviate those symptoms.

 

Whether you have an acute illness, such as a cold or flu, or a chronic illness, such as chronic sinusitis or even thyroid disease, homeopathy can play an essential role in your wellness. Within the homeopathic model, as in most holistic approaches to health, illness is believed to be caused by imbalance within a person. Employing the system of “like cures like” — often along with other therapies — balance is restored; the body begins to function as it should and the symptoms of disease go away.

 

A homeopathic physician will conduct an extensive interview with a patient, identify potential remedies, and closely monitor a patient’s progress until the person is well. During treatment, symptoms may come and go as the body heals. While it’s a very safe therapy, it’s important to work with a practitioner who has been fully trained in order to achieve the best results possible.

 

Elena Klimenko, MD, is a board certified internist and certified in clinical homeopathy and functional medicine, will help you decide which homeopathic medicine is right for you. In her practice, she uses lifestyle modification and natural remedies, such as homeopathy, herbs and food based supplements  to address the root cause of your medical symptoms and guide your body towards optimal health. Call today to speak with Dr. Klimenko at 212-696- HEAL(4325).

References

  • Cody, G.W. & Hascall, H., “The History of Naturopathic Medicine: The Emergence and Evolution of an American School of Healing” in Pizzorno, J.E. & Murray, M. T. Textbook of Natural Medicine (2013). p. 37.

  • Lange, A. & Gaylord, S.A., “Homeopathy” in Pizzorno, J.E. & Murray, M. T. Textbook of Natural Medicine (2013). p. 314-32

Posted in Health News, regular | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1,030 Comments

5 Natural Ways to Lift Your Libido

picture1It’s hard to admit to yourself. Even harder to talk about. But there it is: your sex drive has taken a dive and you don’t know why. You’re likely embarrassed, confused and upset. Try not to be. Over the course of a lifetime, it happens to lots of us for lots of reasons.

Studies show that as many as 43% of women and 31% of men experience a drop in libido at some time in their life. Without a doubt, this has an impact on your overall physical and emotional health, as well as your relationship with your partner. Ironically, those same three issues are often the underlying factors in a low sex drive, which can be attributed to lifestyle and relationship problems, age-related hormonal changes, stress, physical disability, and certain medications. But there is help. Before venturing into unknown territory with a mass-marketed “quickie fix,” consider a variety of holistic approaches to help lift your libido.

Take Specialized Herbs. Several herbs have been studied for their positive impact on low sex drive, insufficient hormone levels, and performance problems, such as erectile dysfunction or inability to achieve orgasm. Herbs to consider are Panax Ginseng, Yohimbe, Maca Root, and Dong Quai. Each one works differently and some can interact with other medicines. It’s important to first consult with a qualified health professional before trying any herbal remedy.

Get to the Point with Acupuncture. Shown to be a beneficial complementary therapy for sexual dysfunction, acupuncture can help boost libido by stimulating physiological systems in the body that are involved in sexual response.

Talk about Sex. Sometimes what’s not going on in the bedroom has a lot to do with how you and your partner communicate. From the honeymoon period, to being together for decades, sexual needs can and do change. Have honest, open conversations. Consider engaging the services of a sex therapist, who can guide you toward strategies that will lead to more fulfilling and intimate times together.

Enjoy Forbidden Fruits. While there are few specific studies on the aphrodisiac effects of fruits, for centuries different cultures have touted the stimulating benefits of foods such as avocados, figs, pomegranate, dark chocolate, watermelon, and strawberries. The most likely effect of having these foods in your diet is that they provide vitamins and minerals necessary for peak performance of the whole body. Why not experiment with pomegranate wine and dark chocolate nibs to get you in the mood?

Move that Body. Exercise improves circulation, creates sexy muscles, helps manage stress. and promotes both positive body image. When you feel good physically and emotionally, you’re more likely to be in the mood for love. Also, working out with your partner can stimulate the sexual energy between you.

Healthy lifestyle practices provide the best foundation for enhancing sexual prowess. When the body is unhealthy, it may not respond optimally to the use of holistic approaches, which are intended to work synergistically with your natural ebb and flow.

Elena Klimenko, MD, a certified functional medicine physician, will help you decide the right course of treatment to help improve your sex drive. In her practice, she uses lifestyle modification and natural remedies to address the root cause of your medical symptoms. Call today to find out more about functional medicine and speak with Dr. Klimenko at 212-696- HEAL(4325).

 

References

  • Kotta, S., Ansari, S.H., & Ali, J., “Exploring Scientifically Proven Herbal Aphrodisiacs.” Pharmacognosy Reviews (2013) 7:13, 1-10. Accessed on 10 June 2016: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3731873/#sec1-4title
  • Meletis, C.D. “Nature’s True Aphrodisiacs: Vital Health Factors For Men and Women.” Alternative and Complementary Therapies.(July 2004) 6:4, 207-211. doi:10.1089/10762800050115176. Available from: http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/abs/10.1089/10762800050115176?journalCode=act&
  • Murphy, L. L. & Lee, T. J.-F. “Ginseng, Sex Behavior, and Nitric Oxide.” Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences (2002) 962:372-377. doi: 10.1111/j.1749-6632.2002.tb04081.x Accessed on 13 June 2016: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1749-6632.2002.tb04081.x/abstract
  • Everyday Health. “Understanding Low Libido.” Accessed on June 27, 2016. http://www.everydayhealth.com/sexual-health/low-libido.aspx
  • Cleveland Clinic. “How Integrative Medicine can help You Enhance Your Libido.” Online Health Chat with Brenda Powell, MD, Integrative Medicine Physician, and Lead Acupuncturist Jamie Starkey, Lac. Accessed on 13 June 2016: http://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/transcripts/1351_integrative-medicine-can-help-you-enhance-your-libido-
  • Saw Palmetto: http://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplements/saw-palmetto/background/hrb-20059958
  • Bella, A.J. & Shamoul, R., “Traditional plant aphrodisiacs and male sexual dysfunction.” Phytother Res. (2014) 6:28, 831-5. PMID: 25032254. Accessed on 10 June 2016: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25032254
  • Avey, T. “Why these 10 Foods are Edible Aphrodisiacs.” PBS.org (2014). Accessed on 13 June 2016: http://www.pbs.org/food/the-history-kitchen/10-edible-aphrodisiacs/
  • Bay, R. et al. “Effect of Combined Psycho-Physiological Stretching and Breathing Therapy on Sexual Satisfaction.” BMC Urology (2013) 13:16. PMC. Accessed on 13 June 2016: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3614470/
  • American Council on Exercise. “Studies Show Working Out can Improve Your Sex Life.” Accessed on 12 June 2016: http://www.acefitness.org/acefit/fitness-fact-article/159/studies-show-exercise-can-improve-your-sex/
  • Penhollow, T. M. & Young, M. “Sexual desirability and sexual performance: Does exercise and fitness really matter?” Electronic Journal of Human Sexuality (October 2004) 7. Accessed on 13 June 2016: http://www.ejhs.org/volume7/fitness.html
  • Sifferlin, A. “Scientists on Aphrodisiacs: What Works and What Doesn’t?” Time online (September 9, 2015) based on a research report from International Society of Sexual Medicine. Accessed on 13 June 2016: http://time.com/3984196/aphrodisiacs-that-work/
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Preventing Blood Clots with Food

picture1A compound called Rutin, commonly found in fruits and vegetables and sold over the counter as a dietary supplement, has been shown to inhibit the formation of blood clots in an animal model of thrombosis.

 

These findings, led by investigators at Harvard-affiliated Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and published online issue of The Journal of Clinical Investigation (JCI), identify a novel strategy for preventing thrombosis, and help pave the way for clinical testing of this popular flavonoid as a therapy for the prevention and treatment of stroke and heart attack, as well as deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism.

 

It’s not always fully appreciated that the majority of Americans will die as the result of a blood clot in either their heart or their brain,” says senior author Robert Flaumenhaft, an investigator in the Division of Hemostasis and Thrombosis at BIDMC and associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. “Approximately half of all morbidity and mortality in the United States can be attributed to heart attack or stroke.”

 

The study focused on protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), which is found in all cells and rapidly secreted from clotting cell (platelets) and arterial wall lining cells (endothelial cells) when a clot forms in a blood vessel. Interestingly, the inhibition of PDI could block thrombosis in a mouse model.

 

“This was a transformative and unanticipated finding because it identified, for the first time, that PDI is secreted from cells in a live animal and is a potential target for preventing thrombosis,” says Flaumenhaft. However, because intracellular PDI is necessary for the proper synthesis of proteins, the scientists had to identify a specific compound that could block the thrombosis-causing extracellular PDI — without inhibiting the intracellular PDI.

 

They began by conducting a screening  of a wide range of compounds to identify PDI inhibitors. Among the more than 5,000 compounds that were screened, quercetin-3-rutinoside (rutin) emerged as the most potent agent. “Rutin was essentially the champion compound,” says Flaumenhaft.

 

A bioflavonoid that is naturally found in many fruits and vegetables, including onions, apples, and citrus fruits, as well as teas, rutin is also sold as an herbal supplement, having received a special designation for safety from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Surprisingly, studies of the rutin molecule demonstrated that the same part of the molecule that provides rutin with its ability to inhibit PDI also prevents the compound from entering cells.

 

“That finding explained how this compound can be both a potent inhibitor of PDI and a safe food supplement,” says Flaumenhaft. “Our next questions were: Is this compound anti-thrombotic? Can it prevent blood clots?”

 

The team went on to test rutin in a mouse model of thrombosis. Because they knew that humans would be taking rutin in pill form, they included studies in which the compound was administered orally and determined that it successfully retained its anti-thrombotic properties when it was metabolized following oral ingestion.

 

“Rutin proved to be the most potently anti-thrombotic compound that we ever tested in this model,” says Flaumenhaft. Of particular note, rutin was shown to inhibit both platelet accumulation and fibrin generation during thrombus formation. “Clots occur in both arteries and in veins,” explains Flaumenhaft. “Clots in arteries are platelet-rich, while those in veins are fibrin-rich. This discovery suggests that a single agent can treat and prevent both types of clots.”

 

Even with the use of existing anti-clotting therapies, such as aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), and warfarin (Coumadin), each year there are approximately 400,000 recurrent episodes among patients who previously experienced a stroke or heart attack, says Flaumenhaft.

 

“A safe and inexpensive drug that could reduce recurrent clots could help save thousands of lives,” he adds. “These preclinical trials provide proof-of-principle that PDI is an important therapeutic target for anti-thrombotic therapy, and because the FDA has already established that rutin is safe, we are poised to expeditiously test this idea in a clinical trial, without the time and expense required to establish the safety of a new drug.”

 

I am Elena Klimenko, MD, an internist and certified functional medicine physician. I ve been using food based form of Rutin supplement to prevent thrombosis without the side effects of pharmaceutical drugs. If you question if Rutin is right for you, call us. In our practice we use functional medicine, acupuncture and homeopathy to address the root cause of your medical symptoms and get your body to optimal health. Call today to find out more about functional medicine and speak with Dr. Klimenko at 212-696- HEAL(4325).

 

References

  • Flaumenhaft, Robert. “Harvard Catalyst Profiles.” Harvard Catalyst. N.p., n.d. Web. 9 July 2016.
  • “High Throughput Screening (HTS).” High Throughput Screening (HTS). N.p., n.d. Web. 14 July 2016.
  • Prescott, Bonnie. “Flavonoid Compound Can Prevent Blood Clots.” Harvard Gazette. N.p., 9 May 2012. Web. 9 July 2016.

 

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The Fig: Sweet. Succulent. Sensual.

picture1One of the “Seven Spices of Israel” and referenced in many religious texts as a sacred fruit, the fig (Angeer), is rich in nutrition and history. For centuries, figs have been referenced in mythology and traditional medicine as a powerful sexual supplement. While they have yet to be adequately studied as an aphrodisiac in humans, some animal studies show figs can increase sperm count and motility. Additionally, they are a great source of dietary fiber, vitamin B6, copper, potassium, calcium, manganese, and the antioxidant vitamins A, C, and E.

 

The fig offers a unique combination of textures – chewy flesh, smooth skin, and crunchy seeds. California figs are typically harvested June through September. European varieties are available into the fall months. The majority of figs are dried fruits that can be enjoyed anytime of the year.

 

When selecting dried figs, they should be plump and soft. They will keep for long periods in a cool, dry place. When choosing fresh figs, which are beautifully delicate, select those with deep color, little bruising and sweet fragrance. Keep them in the fridge and plan to eat them in one or two days; don’t wash until ready to eat. If figs are not yet ripe, keep them at room temperature to ripen.

Figs can add a sweet sensation to just about any dish. But the high fiber can produce a laxative effect, so don’t over do it.

 

Roasted Fig and Goat Cheese

You and your partner will swoon over the delectable combination of sweet, ripe fig filled with creamy goat cheese and drizzled with tangy balsamic and honey. All natural and gluten free, perfect for a romantic appetizer or healthy snacking after a little love in the afternoon!

 

Ingredients 

  • 12 Black Mission figs, halved vertically
  • 1 Tbs unsalted butter
  • 3 Tbs balsamic vinegar
  • 3 Tbs honey
  • 2-3 ounces fresh goat cheese
  • Flaky sea salt, to taste

 

Preparation:

  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.
  2. While the oven preheats, melt the butter in a small saucepan, along with the balsamic vinegar, honey, and a hefty pinch of salt. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer and cook about 5 minutes, or until slightly thickened.
  3. Place the figs, cut side up, in a baking dish the size of a pie pan. Top each fig half with a 1/2 tsp to 1 tsp of goat cheese. Drizzle the balsamic vinegar syrup over the figs.
  4. Roast in the oven until very soft, 10 to 15 minutes.
  5. Arrange on a platter and sprinkle with flaky salt.

 

Call our office 212-696-4325 if you want to receive a medical consultation and guidance how to improve your health. Here, at Healthy Wealthy & Wise Medical, P.C. we evaluate our patients through holistic and functional medicine understanding of health and balance of vital organs and system and prescribe a comprehensive treatment plan.

 

References

  • Patil, V. & Patil, V.R., “Ficas carica: An Overview.” Research Jl. of Medicinal Plants. (2011) 5:3, 246-253. Accessed on 10 June 2016: http://docsdrive.com/pdfs/academicjournals/rjmp/2011/246-253.pdf
  • California Rare Fruit Growers. Accessed on 10 June 2016: https://www.crfg.org/pubs/ff/fig.html
  • The World’s Healthiest Foods. Accessed on 10 June 2016: http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=24#nutritionalprofile
  • Organic Facts. “Health Benefits of Fig.” Accessed on 10 June 2016: https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/fruit/health-benefits-of-figs-or-anjeer.html *Has a terrific chart How to Stay Healthy on Figs that is downloadable.
  • Naghdi M., Maghbool M., et al. “Effects of Common Fig (Ficus carica) Leaf Extracts on Sperm Parameters and Testis of Mice Intoxicated with Formaldehyde.” Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, (2016) doi:10.1155/2016/2539127. Accessed 10 June 2016: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4745414/
  • http://www.popsugar.com/food/Easy-Roasted-Fig-Goat-Cheese-Recipe-9205886
Posted in Diets, Health News, Recipes | Tagged , , , , | 398 Comments

Rose Hips for Wellness

Picture1There’s nothing like a rose to stimulate feelings of wellbeing. And nothing quite like rose hip – the actual fruit of a rose – to enhance health and promote wellness.

 

Of all the roses, the beautiful Wild Dog Rose is the type most often cultivated for their hips. Once the flower has bloomed, and all the petals have fallen off, the hip is picked and used in a range of herbal preparations. Rose hips contain a variety of antioxidants (especially Vitamin C), Vitamin A, carotenoids, and other plant compounds that are recognized for their role in preventing degenerative disease, including heart disease and certain types of cancer.

 

Many natural health practitioners use rose hip to treat wounds and inflammation. Rose hip oil is commonly used in cosmetics as it has the ability to revitalize skin cells. It has been used to treat scars, acne and burns. In Germany, rose hip powder (capsule) has been used to treat osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Herbalists have long used rose hip tea to ease constipation and as a supplement to treat a cold.

 

Rose hip pulp can be incorporated into sauces or made into a jelly. Standardized extracts are also available in capsules. Always check with your wellness practitioner before using any herbal remedy.

 

Elena Klimenko, MD, a certified functional medicine physician, will help you decide if Rose Hip is the right supplement for you. In her practice, she uses lifestyle modification and natural remedies to address the root cause of your medical symptoms. Call today to find out more about functional medicine and speak with Dr. Klimenko at 212-696- HEAL(4325).

 

References

  • Pyke, Magnus, and Ronald Melville. “Vitamin C in Rose Hips.” Biochemical Journal 36.3-4 (1942): 336-339. Accessed on March 28, 2016. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1265699/
  • Iherb.com “Rose Hip” Accessed on March 28, 2016. http://www.herbwisdom.com/herb-rose-hip.html
  • Mahboubi, M. “Rosa Damascena as Holy Ancient Herb with Novel Applications.” Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine 6.1 (2016): 10-16. PMC. Web. 28 Mar. 2016. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4737971/
  • Phetcharat, L., Wongsuphasawat, K. & Winther, K. “The Effectiveness of a Standardized Rose Hip Powder, “Containing Seeds and Shells of Rosa Canina, on Cell Longevity, Skin Wrinkles, Moisture, and Elasticity.” Clinical Interventions in Aging 10 (2015), 1849-1856. PMC. Web. 28 Mar. 2016. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4655903/
  • Schwager, J.,et al. “A Novel Rose Hip Preparation with Enhanced Anti-Inflammatory and Chondroprotective Effects.” Mediators of Inflammation (2014) October. PMC. doi: 10.1155/2014/105710 Web. 28 Mar. 2016 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4211164/
  • S.N. Willich, K. Rossnagel, et al., “Rose hip herbal remedy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis – a randomised controlled trial.” Phytomedicine (2010) 17:2, 87-93. doi: 10.1016/j.phymed.2009.09.003 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0944711309002311
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The Importance of Beta-Carotene

13925218_1067682639933446_5817194135381071558_nBeta-carotene has two important functions in the body: It functions as an antioxidant, protecting cells against damage, and it can be converted to Vitamin A (retinol), critical to maintaining skin and eye health.

 

Without beta-carotene, our bodies are unable to manufacture Vitamin A. And without sufficient Vitamin A, nearly all of our systems are at risk, including lungs, kidneys and immune function. Research shows that people who consume the necessary levels of beta-carotene are able to lower their risk for coronary artery disease, stroke, macular degeneration, and other age-related diseases.

 

You can get beta-carotene from a variety of foods:

  • Apricots
  • Asparagus
  • Broccoli
  • Carrots
  • Chinese cabbage
  • Yam/Sweet Potato
  • Spinach
  • Kale

 

The National Institutes of Health recommends a daily intake of 3,000 IU for adult men and 2,310 IU for adult women. For children, amounts vary according to age. While beta-carotene deficiency is rare in most industrialized countries, it can be difficult getting the recommended levels simply from food. That’s where supplements come in. In consult with your healthcare practitioner, design a plan that meets your individual needs. You may want to consider a supplement with a mixture of carotenoids, including beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, lycopene, astaxanthin, lutein and zeaxanthin.

It’s possible to take too much beta-carotene. This is usually indicated by a yellowing of the skin, palms or soles and is known as carotenemia. Once consumption of beta carotene is reduced, this yellowing fades over time. As always, your best outcomes are achieved when working closely with your healthcare practitioner.

 

Elena Klimenko, MD, a certified functional medicine physician, will help you decide if Beta-Carotene is the right supplement for you. In her practice, she uses lifestyle modification and natural remedies to address the root cause of your medical symptoms. Call today to find out more about functional medicine and speak with Dr. Klimenko at 212-696- HEAL(4325).

 

References

  • com “What is Beta Carotene?” Accessed on March 30, 2016. http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/252758.php
  • National Institutes of Health. Vitamin A. Medical handout for health professionals. https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminA-HealthProfessional/
  • com. “Beta Carotene”. Accessed on March 30, 2016. https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/999.html
  • Institute of Medicine, Food and Nutrition Board. Beta-carotene and other carotenoids. Dietary reference intakes for vitamin C, vitamin E, selenium, and carotenoids. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press; 2000:325-400. Accessed on March 30, 2016 http://www.nap.edu/read/9810/chapter/1
  • Bendich, A. “Functions and Actions of Retinoids and Carotenoids: Building on the Vision of James Allen Olson.” Jnl of Nutrition. (2004) American Society for Nutritional Sciences. Accessed on March 30, 2016. http://jn.nutrition.org/content/134/1/225S.full.pdf
  • van Poppel G, Spanhaak S, Ockhuizen T. Effect of beta-carotene on immunological indexes in healthy male smokers. Am J Clin Nutr. 1993; 57(3):402-407. Accessed on March 30, 2016 http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/57/3/402?related-urls=yes&legid=ajcn;57/3/402
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Nurture Your Child’s Emotional Intelligence

13775587_1054682181233492_8512966416502390434_nWe want the best for our children. From the moment they’re born, we look for ways to stimulate learning potential and strengthen their IQ (Intelligence Quotient). While studies differ on whether we can actually enhance IQ, they concur that we can – and should – support Emotional Intelligence/Quotient (EQ). Doing so not only improves a child’s ability to learn, it provides tools for managing emotions and developing coping skills that result in healthy self-esteem and good decision-making.

 

EQ is defined as the ability to identify and manage emotions, as well as having regard for the emotions of others. People with high EQ exhibit leadership skills and are typically excellent team members. Of course we want our children to have a high EQ. However, with our busy adult lives and our child’s organized play, we seem to be ignoring its importance. Today, nearly one in five children has an emotional disorder such as anxiety, depression, or behavioral conduct problems.

 

According to Dr. Gerald Newmark, founder of the Children’s Project, “[It is vital] to create a positive atmosphere in which family members interact with each other in ways that make everyone feel respected, important, accepted, and secure.” In doing so, “we can become a powerful force for developing emotionally healthy and high-achieving children and families.”

 

Try incorporating these strategies into your family’s routine:

 

Model Coping Skills. Children learn by observing you. Research shows this begins in the prenatal period, when developing babies sense maternal stress. When your anxiety levels get high, don’t just muddle on. Take time out. Do something just for you. This kind of self-awareness models emotional health and shows children how to cope with stress.

 

Solve Problems Together. Whether it’s kids who don’t want to get out of bed for school or an epic struggle around chores, open communication is the best way to reduce tension. Talk with your kids about what’s important to your family and why. Invite them to offer solutions.

 

Listen to Your Kids. Too often adults view kids’ problems as insignificant or silly. But our children see themselves as real people with real problems. Ask them about their challenges and concerns. When children feel heard, they feel validated and that builds trust between them and you.

 

Express Gratitude. Acknowledge the good things in your life; this steers focus away from negative events and gives new perspective to tough situations. Keep a family journal, or during mealtime have each person express what she or he is grateful for that day.

 

Honor a Child’s Spirit. Children can experience profound moments that shape their lives in enduring ways. It can be a moment of wonder (seeing the Grand Canyon for the first time) or an awareness of their own inner wisdom (an ‘a-ha’ moment). It can be moments in which children ask big questions about life. Set aside time to discover and discuss these experiences. They can become cornerstones in a child’s evolving sense of themselves and an awareness of something greater than the material world.

 

Elena Klimenko, MD is an integrative medicine specialist who utilizes multiple natural modalities like functional medicine, homeopathy and acupuncture to help treat emotional disorders. For more information, call 212-696-4325.

 

References:

  • Firestone, L. “7 Tips to raising an Emotionally Healthy Child.” Psychology Today website. Accessed on April 8, 2016. https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/compassion-matters/201211/7-tips-raising-emotionally-healthy-child
  • The Children’s Project.com Extensive Resources on “Developing Emotionally Healthy Children, Families, Schools & Communities.” Accessed on April 8, 2016. http://emotionallyhealthychildren.org/resources/ –also see: Family Meetings: http://emotionallyhealthychildren.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/Family_Meetings.pdf
  • CDC 24/7. “Children’s Mental Health Surveillance Report – U.S. 2005-2011.” Accessed on April 11, 2016. http://www.cdc.gov/features/childrensmentalhealth/
  • Goleman, Daniel. Emotional Intelligence. Online resources accessed April 9, 2016. http://www.danielgoleman.info/topics/emotional-intelligence/
  • Kamrath, S. “Happy Healthy Child: A Holistic Approach – An Interview with Bruce Lipton.” (2012). Brucelipton.com Accessed on April 11, 2016. https://www.brucelipton.com/resource/article/happy-healthy-child-holistic-approach
  • com Resources for Understanding Children’s Emotions & Behavior. Accessed on April 8, 2016. http://kidshealth.org/en/parents/emotions/
  • com “Stress in Childhood.” Accessed on April 8, 2016. https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002059.htm
  • Walton, Alice G., “How Parent’s Stress Can Hurt a Child, From the Inside Out.” Forbes online. July 25, 2012. Accessed on April 8, 2016. http://www.forbes.com/sites/alicegwalton/2012/07/25/how-parents-stress-can-hurt-a-child-from-the-inside-out/#74c7a4ff13f8
  • Repetti, R. L.,Taylor, S.E., et al., “Risky families: Family social environments and the mental and physical health of offspring.” Psychological Bulletin (Mar 2002).128(2), 330-366. Accessed on April 8, 2016. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0033-2909.128.2.330
  • Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning. Family Tools for Nurturing Children’s Social Emotional Development. Accessed on April 8, 2016. http://csefel.vanderbilt.edu/resources/family.html
  • com Global Resources and Network on Children’s Spiritual Life and Wellbeing. http://childspirit.org/about/overview/
  • Blanchard, L.T. et al., “Emotional, Developmental, and Behavioral Health of American Children and Their Families: A Report From the 2003 National Survey of Children’s Health.” Pediatrics (June 2006). 117(6). Accessed on April 8, 2016. PDF available: http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/117/6/e1202.short
  • Association for Psychological Science Online. “Change in Mother’s Mental State Can Influence her Baby’s Development Before and After Birth.” Accessed on April 11, 2016. http://www.psychologicalscience.org/index.php/news/releases/a-fetus-can-sense-moms-psychological-state.html
  • American Psychological Association. Identifying signs of stress in your children and teens. Available at http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/stress-children.aspx. Accessed on April 8, 2016.
  • American Academy of Pediatrics. “Tips to Promote Social-Emotional Health Among Young Children.” Accessed on April 8, 2016. http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc/tta-system/health/docs/se-tips-care-providers.pdf?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=OHS+Children+Mental+Health+Awareness+Day+-+May&utm_content=OHS+Children+Mental+Health+Awareness+Day+-+May+CID_0dc7d994ec2c0e19e5900739f723c066&utm_source=CM%20Eblast&utm_term=Tips%20to%20Promote%20Social-Emotional%20Health%20Among%20Young%20Children
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Avocado Chocolate Mousse (gluten free)

avocado-mousseThere are so many reasons – and so many ways – to love avocado. A culinary superfood, avocados provide up to 20 nutrients including vitamins K, C and E, as well as folate, magnesium, zinc, and potassium. In fact, they actually have more potassium than bananas.

 

Unlike most fruits, avocado is low in carbohydrates and high in a healthy fat called oleic acid. Like olive oil, oleic acid has been linked to health benefits such as reducing inflammation, protecting cells against cancer, and reducing cholesterol. This amazing fruit also improves digestive health and helps your body absorb other nutrients.

There are limitless ways to add avocado to snacks or meals: Use it as a healthy spread on toast; blend it into scrambled eggs; add it to dips, salsa, or soup; slice for a salad topping.

 

Avocado is optimally ripe when the fruit is mildly soft to touch. Its flesh should be creamy and green-gold in color. If you don’t use the whole fruit at one time, keep leftovers fresh by leaving the pit in the unused portion and allow it to sit, uncovered, on a counter for a few hours before placing it in the fridge (still uncovered) for up to two days. When you want to use the other half, simply peel off the brown crust to reveal a soft and deliciously ripe avocado beneath.

 

 Vegan Avocado Chocolate Mousse

 Want to satisfy your sweet tooth without adding inches to your waistline? This rich, creamy avocado mousse is about as close as you’ll get to a truly healthy chocolate treat. Serves 1.

 

Ingredients

  • 1 ripe avocado, skin and pit removed, mash slightly with a fork
  • 3 1/2 Tbs unsweetened dark chocolate cocoa powder
  • 3 1/2 Tbs RAW honey
  • Unsweetened almond, coconut or hemp milk

 

Preparation:

  • Place avocado and cocoa powder in food processor. Add honey.
  • Process avocado, cocoa powder and honey for approximately 1 min, pausing to scrape the sides, or until a thick, smooth mousse forms.
  • Add milk as needed to bring to desired consistency.
  • Spoon mousse into a small bowl; top with almonds or fresh fruit.

 

Call our office 212-696-HEAL if you want to receive a medical consultation and guidance how to improve your health. Here, at Healthy Wealthy & Wise Medical, P.C. we evaluate our patients through holistic and functional medicine understanding of health and balance of vital organs and system and prescribe a comprehensive treatment plan.

 

References

  • Dreher, Mark L., and Adrienne J. Davenport. “Hass Avocado Composition and Potential Health Effects.” Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition 53.7 (2013): 738-750. PMC. Web. 28 Mar. 2016.
  • com. “What’s New and Beneficial About Avocados?” http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=5 Accessed on March 29, 2016
  • com “Avocado 101” https://authoritynutrition.com/foods/avocado/ Accessed on March 29, 2016
  • “12 Proven Benefits of Avocado” https://authoritynutrition.com/
  • Ding H, Chin YW, Kinghorn AD, et al. “Chemopreventive characteristics of avocado fruit. Semin Cancer Biol.” (2007 May 17). Accessed on March 29, 2016. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17582784
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Flaxseed Nutrients And A Tasty Muffin Recipe

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While research results are mixed around flaxseed and its ability to reduce menopausal symptoms, there are enough positive findings to support use of this nutrient-rich herb. For many women it has made the difference between comfort and discomfort when it comes to reduction of hot flashes, night sweats, and mood swings. Here are three nutrients unique to flaxseed, all of which play a role in supporting good health.

 

  1. Omega-3 Fatty Acids: beneficial for preventing or treating certain health conditions, including heart disease and depression.

 

  1. Mucilage: refers to water-soluble, gel-forming fiber that can provide special support to the intestinal tract. This makes flaxseed an excellent support to digestion and relief of constipation.

 

  1. Lignans: provides fiber-related polyphenols that have two important health benefits. They provide antioxidants, which help prevent damage to other cells in the body and are associated with preventing disease. Additionally, polyphenols in lignans influence hormone metabolism.

 

Purchasing and Storing Flax

Raw flaxseed ranges in color from amber/gold to tan/brown. White or green flaxseed has been harvested before full maturity; black flaxseeds were likely harvested after full maturity. Brown or amber color flaxseed have the full benefits of the seed. Remember, because flaxseed is  reach in fats it get rancid relatively fast. When it happens it loses almost all nutritional benefits and become burden for the body’s antioxidant system. That is why, if possible, purchase the whole seed in bulk, store in the freezer and grind only the amount needed for immediate use. Flaxseed can be ground, sprinkled on cereal, added to baking mixes and used as a thickening agent in many recipes.

Gluten-free Flaxseed Apple Muffins

Whether you’re serving breakfast on the deck or packing a picnic lunch, these muffins add a perfect combination of sweetness and nutrition to your meal. Enjoy them plain or topped with preserves.

Ingredients

  • 2 medium apples
  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose gluten-free flour
  • 1 1/2 cups flaxseed meal
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 large eggs, lightly beaten
  • 3/4 cup unsweetened almond milk
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/4 cup whole flaxseeds

Makes 6 muffins.

Instructions

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Line a six-muffin tin with large paper cups and set aside. Peel and puree the apples in a blender or food processor. Set aside (mixture will turn brown).

In a large bowl, mix flour, flaxseed meal, sugar, baking soda, baking powder, salt, and cinnamon. In a separate bowl, combine the milk, eggs, and vanilla. Mix well, and slowly pour the liquid ingredients into the dry ingredients, stirring. When wet and dry ingredients are combined, add the apple puree; stir to combine.

Using a measuring cup or scoop, evenly divide the batter between the muffin cups. (fill nearly all the way to the top; because these are gluten-free, they won’t rise very much.) Sprinkle flax seeds on top of each muffin. Bake, uncovered, for 20-30 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in the center of the muffin comes out clean. Cool in the muffin tin for 5 to 10 minutes.
Muffins will keep in an airtight container for 3 days.

 

 

References

Flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum)

  • com “What’s New and Beneficial About Flaxseed?” Accessed on March 23, 2016. http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=81
  • University of Maryland Medical Center Complementary and Alternative Medicine Guide. “Menopause” Accessed on March 23, 2016. http://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/condition/menopause
  • Goyal, A., et al., “Flax and Flaxseed Oil: An Ancient Medicine & Modern Functional Food.” Journal of Food Science and Technology 51.9 (2014): 1633–1653. PMC. Web. 24 Mar. 2016. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4152533/
  • Peterson, J., et al., “Dietary Lignans: Physiology and Potential for Cardiovascular Disease Risk Reduction.” Nutrition reviews 68.10 (2010): 571–603. PMC. Web. 24 Mar. 2016. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2951311/
  • Poluzzi, E.,et al., “Phytoestrogens in Postmenopause: The State of the Art from a Chemical, Pharmacological and Regulatory Perspective.” Current Medicinal Chemistry 21.4 (2014): 417–436. PMC. Web. 24 Mar. 2016. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3963458/
  • Ewies, AA. “Phytoestrogens in the Management of Menopause: up-to-date.” Obstet Gynecol Surv (2002, May). 57(5): pp 306-13. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11997677
  • Dew, T.P., et al., “Controlled Flax Interventions for the Improvement of Menopausal Symptoms and Postmenopausal Bone Health.” Menopause. (2013) 20:11, pp. 1207-1215. Accessed on March 23, 2016.
  • Botanical-online.com “Mucilage Properties” Accessed on March 24, 2016. http://www.botanical-online.com/english/mucilage.htm

 

Gluten-free Flaxseed Apple Muffins

Adapted from: http://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/gluten-free-flax-seed-muffins

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Could Diindolylmethane (DIM) Protect Against Cancer?

Picture1Diindolylmethane (DIM) is a compound found in “cruciferous” vegetables such as cabbage, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, and broccoli. Scientists think these crunchy vegetables may help protect the body against cancer because they contain diindolylmethane and a related chemical called indole-3-carbinol (I3C).

 

DIM helps balance the sex hormone estrogen and testosterone. When the body breaks down estrogen, for example, it can form either a harmful or beneficial metabolite. DIM, in some clinical and animal studies, has been shown to help the body form the more beneficial estrogen metabolite and reduce formation of the harmful metabolite. The beneficial estrogen metabolites can have many positive effects, including reducing the risk for some types of cancer. DIM may benefit patients with certain types of prostate cancer and may help reverse abnormal changes in cells on the surface of the cervix. Some scientists think DIM will be useful for preventing breast, uterine and colorectal cancer. However, because of the variability in types of cancer and the sensitivity of the estrogen system in the body, DIM and I3C supplements may not be appropriate for everyone.

 

Elena Klimenko, MD, a certified functional medicine physician, will help you decide if DIM is the right supplement for you. In her practice she uses the advanced hormonal testing to evaluate your individual risk of hormonal related conditions. She uses life style modification and natural remedies to address the root cause of the medical problems. Call today to find out more about functional medicine and speak to Dr. Klimenko at 212-696- HEAL(4325).

 

References

  • Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center Integrative Medicine Database. https://www.mskcc.org/cancer-care/integrative-medicine/herbs/diindolylmethane
  • Fujioka, N. et al., ” Research on cruciferous vegetables, indole-3-carbinol, and cancer prevention: a tribute to lee w. wattenberg.” Mol Nutr Food Res (Feb 2016) doi: 10.1002/mnfr.201500889. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26840393
  • Ashrafian, L.,et al. “Double-blind randomized placebo-controlled multicenter clinical trial (phase IIa) on di-indolylmethane’s efficacy and safety in the treatment of CIN: implications for cervical cancer prevention.” The EPMA Journal. (2015) 6:25. doi:10.1186/s13167-015-0048-9. Accessed on March 23, 2016: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4685602/
  • Ahmad, A., et al., “The Bounty of Nature for changing the cancer landscape.” Mol Nutr Food Res (Jan 2016). doi: 10.1002/mnfr.201500867. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26799714
  • Higdon, J.V. et al., “Cruciferous vegetables and human cancer risk: epidemiologic evidence and mechanistic basis.” Pharmacol Res. (Mar 2007) 55(3): p 224-36. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1043661807000321
  • Minich, D.M. & Bland, S. “A Review of the Clinical Efficacy and Safety of Cruciferous Vegetable Phytochemicals.” DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1753-4887.2007.tb00303.x p 259-267 First published online: 1 June 2007. Available from: http://nutritionreviews.oxfordjournals.org/content/65/6/259
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